...Redifining Journalism for Development

Meningitis kills six pupils in Bauchi

338

Meningitis kills six pupils in Bauchi

Story by Uchechi OGBUEHI-DANIEL, Lagos

Six Almajiri pupils have lost their lives due to a suspected meningitis outbreak in Udubo village in the Gamawa local government Area in Bauchi state.

The Chairman, caretaker committee of the local government, Nasiru Bakura, confirmed the deaths to journalists on Friday.

This came following reports on social media claiming that about 15 people have died from the suspected outbreak.

Bakura revealed that the six pupils died in three different Tsangaya schools, all located in Udubo town of Gamawa local government area.

He stated, “The affected Tsangaya schools, are mostly congested by Almajiri pupils, exacerbating the situation.

“Health workers at both the local and state levels are actively managing the outbreak, with drugs procured to treat affected patients.”

READ ALSO: Our parlous health system and the Yobe example, by Hassan Gimba

The chairman emphasised the seriousness of the situation and urged the public to take preventive measures.

It was gathered from a public health expert in Bauchi, Dr Hassan Shu’aibu Musa, that meningitis is a serious infectious disease that affects the meninges, with bacterial meningitis being the most prevalent form.

Musa added that “the disease is transmitted through direct contact with infected persons’ saliva or mucus, as well as inhaling droplets.

“As such, members of the public are advised to avoid overcrowded areas, especially during this outbreak, as a precautionary measure.”

He explained that meningitis is a vaccine-preventable disease and urged parents to ensure their children are vaccinated to be immunized against it.

Speaking on misconceptions, Musa clarified that “meningitis is not connected to witchcraft and patients should consult health experts when symptoms like high fever occur.”

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.