...Redifining Journalism for Development

The Lifesaving Power of Blood Type O+: Why it’s so special, by Maryam Sulaiman

Research indicates that people with blood type O have several health advantages, including a lower risk of heart disease and memory-related issues such as dementia.

278

The Lifesaving Power of Blood Type O+: Why it’s so special, by Maryam Sulaiman

Blood type O-positive (O+) is notable not just for being the most common blood type but also for its critical role in medical emergencies and routine transfusions.

This blood type can be donated to anyone with a positive blood type, including A+, B+, and AB+. Due to its versatility and prevalence, O-positive is the most needed blood type in hospitals and clinics.

O-positive individuals can donate to all positive blood types, making their blood invaluable in transfusions. Over 80% of people have a positive blood type, so O-positive blood is frequently needed and often faces shortages.

In emergencies, such as severe accidents, O-positive blood is the go-to choice when a patient’s blood type is unknown due to its minimal risk of reactions and greater availability compared to O-negative blood.

While O-positive can be widely donated, those with this blood type can only receive blood from O-positive and O-negative donors.

Research indicates that people with blood type O have several health advantages, including a lower risk of heart disease and memory-related issues such as dementia.

O blood types are less likely to suffer from coronary heart disease. This might be due to lower levels of cholesterol and a protein linked to clotting in other blood types.

READ ALSO: How sleeping on the left side affect one’s heart

While people with A, AB, and B blood types have a higher risk of stomach and pancreatic cancers, O blood types have a lower likelihood of these diseases, possibly due to resistance to certain bacteria.

Type A blood individuals tend to have higher cortisol levels, which can make stress harder to manage. Type O individuals may find it easier to cope with stress.

Type O blood cells are less susceptible to malaria as the parasite causing the disease struggles to attach to these cells. Type O individuals are more prone to peptic ulcers but have a lower risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a type of blood clot.

Blood type O-negative is known as the universal donor, capable of donating to anyone regardless of their blood type. This blood type is critical for newborn transfusions and emergencies.

Only 7% of the population has O-negative blood, making it rare and highly sought after. Individuals with O-negative blood who are also CMV negative are especially valued by the Red Cross for donating to infants.

Before the discovery of blood types, transfusions often led to severe complications and fatalities. Today, blood typing ensures safe and effective transfusions, highlighting the importance of compatible blood donations.

Lower risk of cardiovascular diseases may contribute to a longer life span for those with type O blood. Some studies suggest that women with type O blood may have fewer healthy eggs, impacting fertility. Blood types A and B are more frequently associated with type 2 diabetes and stroke, respectively, compared to type O.

Understanding the unique attributes and importance of blood type O-positive not only highlights its critical role in healthcare but also underscores the ongoing need for blood donations from healthy individuals to save lives.

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.